eBent Recumbent Cycling

A Bent Look at Self Contained Touring

My Riding Sandal

with 10 comments

Columbia Surf Tide SandalsThere is an updated version of this post at Riding Sandals Update.

My favorite riding sandals are Columbia Surf Tide Sandals. They are waterproof, comfortable, and inexpensive. They also have a narrower profile that fits better in my PowerGrips.

For me there is also another consideration, many sandals have a toe grip on the insole. The toe grip doesn’t seem to work for me; it presses on the bones in my foot producing an excruciating pain after about 10 miles.

I have used Birkenstock and Clark sandals with great success. The downside on these is that they aren’t waterproof and don’t dry very quickly.

I usually bring 2 pairs of sandals with me on tours so that I can change when I get off the bike. A cool, dry pair of sandals at the end of the day feels pretty good.

Columbia Surf Tide Sandals are on sale now at Campmor.com for about $20.

See Shoes and Pedals for more posts on this topic 

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Written by Roland

March 29, 2006 at 7:18 am

10 Responses

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  1. Hi, sorry are these proper cycling sandals? I mean with soles suitable for clipless pedals? Just wondering because they look pretty good but I can’t find any indication from any site other than here that they’re proper cycling footware.

    Bobstopper

    May 31, 2006 at 10:01 am

  2. Not in that sense. I ride with Power Grips and they work great with PowerGrips. I gave up on clipless a few years ago on recumbents.

    The Shamino are the best looking of the sandals set up for clips. They just don’t fit my feet very well.

    ebent

    May 31, 2006 at 12:39 pm

  3. I would live to get the Shimanos but they don’t make them to a Size 14 (49). The Tierras looked good for just “walking around” sandals, which I was in the market for as well. Alas…Campmor only has Sizes 13 and 17 left at that great price.

    Longfellow

    June 29, 2006 at 12:44 pm

  4. Thanks, you are making my size 12s sound petite.

    Yes, I might have been a little late finding this one. I almost bought the 13s but tried the High Tides in size 12 instead.

    I’d like to be able to wear Tevas and have found one Teva model that works for me on the bike. But any of the Teva with the buckle over the small toe seem to rub my foot the wrong way when it hits the PowerGrips. These Hobbit feet seem to be pretty particular about what they like.

    I haven’t worn shoes except in the snow for 2 years and my foot seems to be widening which may actually help with Teva in the future.

    Enjoy the Ride … Roland

    ebent

    June 29, 2006 at 1:01 pm

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  7. I’m looking for a clipless bicycling sandal to replace my Shimano sandals. While the overall build and fit of the Shimanos are great in my pedal kayak, the darned cleat plates have rusted out.

    This wouldn’t be much of a problem if Shimano designed these beasts so that the cleat plates could be replaced. Unfortunately, the plates are permanently secured in place.

    So, anybody know of a decent bicycling sandal that can handle lots of saltwater exposure?

    Michael

    August 6, 2009 at 8:19 pm

    • It is hard to beat the Shimano sandals, they are the best made I’ve seen and I’ve tried everything I can find. The Keens are also very nice but no less expensive.

      I have given up on cleats and have gone back to my Birkenstocks. Those cork soles are hard to beat for comfort.

      Roland

      August 7, 2009 at 10:24 am

      • Found the Keen cycling sandals last Thursday on sale at a local bike shop that was phasing them. Apparently they were not a popular item at $115, but were selling well at $90.

        Anyway, these sandals have a toe box to protect one’s tootsies from getting stubbed and an insert that velcros at the heel that covers access to the cleat plate. It is trivially easy to change the cleat plate on these sandals.

        I was concerned about comments I had read about the fit for people with wide feet. Before I used them in a 2.5 hour boat race yesterday I wore them around the house. They were even more comfortable than the Shimanos.

        At the race, the did a great job keeping sand and stones off my feet, and were quite comfortable during the race, too. I like the narrower profile which lets me unclip almost all around a crank revolution if I want. The wider Shimano sandals wouldn’t let me unclip unless the sandals were above the cockpit.

        I think I have found true love – so long as the spring in the lace tightener doesn’t corrode, anyway.

        Anonymous

        August 9, 2009 at 5:22 pm

      • Glad the Keens worked out for you

        Enjoy the Ride … Roland

        Roland

        August 12, 2009 at 2:41 pm


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